The fools in the corporate ladder

Postby Non Hic » 2013-03-10 05:14

You know, many (not all) IT-administrators are complete fools. Total control freaks. (Add CEOs, marketing and salesmen to that list too by the way) Specially those who tell systemsdevelopers how to do their job. Just because they know how to create some user in Active fucking Directory, they think they know it all! I mean, what gives them the right to tell the developer how to do things when they are not the ones doing the developing?

Funny thing is, many bosses listen to them. Bosses love to listen to IT-administrators, marketing retards and salesmen. All the bitching and moaning are reserved for the developer! When business go south, who do you think they cut down first? Yeah, you guessed it! Developers! Job insecurity galore! Why do you think they like "young" developers? Because young people can be conned more easily! They will suck the boss's balls day and night much easier than someone who done 20 years of logic. It's a lot harder to get that senior developer to suck the boss's balls and cram bullshit down his throat, you can take that to the bank!

Hey you bastards, how about getting a job as a developer FIRST... spend 20 fucking years of your life coding... and THEN... and ONLY THEN... will you earn the right to give advice to a developer.

I mean, these idiot IT-administrators don't make a living doing development, that's not how they earn they sallary so why do bosses take advice from these idiots? Maybe that's why there is such a shortage of programmers lately, so much so that they have to make such disgusting videos like this one:

(WARNING, the following video will make you sick to your stomach for weeks if you are a developer.)



"Starring Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, will.i.am, Chris Bosh, Jack Dorsey, Tony Hsieh, Drew Houston, Gabe Newell, Ruchi Sanghvi, Elena Silenok, Vanessa Hurst, and Hadi Partovi. Directed by Lesley Chilcott."

I will continue to code... but not for you! Not for your corporations! You will not be able to find great coders like in the 80s and the 90s! Coding is a calling. You cannot sell it by paying some basketball player or a fucking rapper trying to sell programming... "will.i.am"? REALLY? GIVE ME A FUCKING BREAK! Lying pieces of shit just taken some cash from who knows who and doing an advertisement to con people into programming. Allow me to laugh! HAH!

Oh I know that you don't hear a lot from us, the developers... those silent types... you know, true devs who just keep making their fists in their pocket and don't say nothing... but we know... we sure know that all of you corporate bastards are suffering... we know you are worried like hell... that is why you have to sink so low, to create such low class disgusting "advertisement". What do you take us for? Fools? We might be silent but we are no fools! WE SEE. WE KNOW. Logic is all we do, day in and day out. You can go to hell all of you filthy, degenerate corporate motherfuckers! ...and shove all of your "apps" and your prison "walled gardens" where the sun don't shine!

YES, WE SEE!

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Postby Non Hic » 2013-03-10 17:34

Yeah, and as soon as something is called a "homepage" then EVERYBODY seem to suddenly know everything and have an opinion about how things should be done. Even the morons who can barely find the volume control in Windows. Of course, these same morons sit high up and give advice to the developers AND take advice from non-developers!

Oh and by the way, everything should be done in 5 minutes, preferably yesterday! Nothing should cost a dime but should bring in millions.

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Postby Non Hic » 2013-03-10 18:04

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Postby CharlotteTheHarlot » 2013-03-13 02:36

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Postby Non Hic » 2013-03-18 06:44

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Postby Non Hic » 2013-03-28 01:52

73% of IT admins considering quitting due to stress. :lol:

The number of IT professionals considering leaving their job due to workplace stress has jumped from 69% last year to 73%, underlining the increasingly challenging business landscape in the UK and the growing emphasis being placed on IT to help businesses grow, thrive and compete.

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One-third of those surveyed by GFI Software cited dealing with managers as their most stressful job requirement, particularly for IT staff in larger organisations, while handling end user support requests, budget squeeze and tight deadlines were also singled out as the main causes of workplace stress for IT managers.

Key findings include:

* 68% of all IT administrators surveyed consider their job stressful.
* 21% of those surveyed work between three and five hours of overtime in order to keep on top of their workload. 12% work eight to 10 hours a week. In total, almost half (49%) are working six or more hours overtime a week.
* Over a third (35%) of respondents have missed social functions due to work issues. A further 30% of those surveyed have missed out on planned family time because of work demands.
* Over 63% of staff surveyed feel they are either as stressed or more stressed at work than their friends and colleagues.
* 28% of IT admins point to a lack of budget and staff needed to get the job done as their primary reasons for job stress.
* Of the 73% of respondents considering changing their role, 36% do so on a regular basis.
* IT staff from companies sized between 100 and 249 employees are most likely to quit their current role due to stress. Staff from the largest firms surveyed (more than 500 employees) are least likely to quit their role due to work stress.
* The top three sources of stress for IT admins are: management (35%), tight deadlines (19%) and lack of budget (17%). Interestingly enough, users dropped from the second biggest stress cause in 2012 (21%) to only the fourth biggest cause (16%).
Although users are not causing IT staff as much stress as they used to, it isnÔÇÖt stopping them from creating moments that make IT admins want to tear their hair out in frustration. The survey asked IT admins what the most ridiculous thing was they had seen an end user do.

Responses included stories of users complaining their mouse wasnÔÇÖt working when they were trying to use a foam stress squeezer, a user thinking there was a ghost in her PC when IT support staff remoted into it to deliver support, a user who reported the Windows version as being ÔÇ£Patio DoorsÔÇØ, and stories of users who folded up a 5.25inch floppy disc in order to fit it into a 3.5inch disc drive.

The most common issues were users complaining of hardware not working, only for IT to find the device was either not switched on or not plugged in, along with users spilling tea, coffee and other beverages over their computer or keyboard and then denying they had done it.

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Personal lives and health affected by IT work stress

Of great concern is the impact that work stress is having on health and relationships. While a total of 80% of participants revealed that their job had negatively impacted their personal life in some way, the survey discovered some significant personal impact:

* 18% have suffered stress-related health issues due to their work, although this is a stark improvement on 2012 (29%).
* Another 18% also revealed they had experienced a strained or failed relationship due to work stress.
* 19% do not feel great physically as a result of stress, up from 16% last year.
* 28% have lost sleep due to work.
* Just over one-quarter (26%) have had to cancel commitments to family and friends due to work.

ÔÇ£The increasing importance of IT in the workplace -- and with it, the critical responsibility placed on IT professionals ÔÇô makes it impossible to overlook in this yearÔÇÖs survey figures,ÔÇØ said Phil Bousfield, GM IT Operations at GFI Software. ÔÇ£Companies are more reliant than ever on IT innovation, uptime and speed of deployment, and thus, IT staff are under extreme pressure to deliver for the benefit of the whole business. We all know that a happy workforce is a productive workforce, so it is concerning that so many of our survey respondents are stressed to the point that they are actively considering leaving their current role in order to achieve a better work/life balance. For SMBs in particular, the research is a stark reminder that IT staff need to be supported and given the right resources ÔÇô staff, budget and technology - to do their jobs well and that management need to be an enabler, not an obstacle for IT progress.ÔÇØ
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Postby Non Hic » 2013-04-02 18:12

Steve Jobs' First Boss: 'Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today'.

Hugh Pickens wrote:"The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari's refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. 'The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,' says Bushnell. 'Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he'd just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.' While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari's lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell's newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn't turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don't shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don't recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. 'Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese's were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,' says Bushnell, 'One guy had been in jail.'"


The good old days. These days managers advance by minimizing risk, not by innovating. Most companies pay lip service to innovation but few truly recognize it or desire it. They will not hire innovative people.
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Postby CharlotteTheHarlot » 2013-04-02 21:26

I agree, the 1970's were the good old days.

Stones (Mick Taylor), Zep, Sabbath, Purple, Dolls, Montrose, Aerosmith, Priest, UFO, AC/DC, KISS, Scorps, Rush, Nugent, Cooper, VH, Dio, Rainbow ... probably forgot another dozen. Maiden just missed the decade of course.

Oh wait, we were talking about Technology. Nevermind. Please continue!
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Postby Non Hic » 2013-04-03 00:34

Let's not forget things like:



:) :D :)
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Postby Non Hic » 2013-04-10 16:35

Excellently put:

john.smith_2084 wrote:I am a Software Developer - Contractor, and this is why IT suck

Before I start, the Salary is Good, that is the only reason.

Anyway,

- If the manager is not happy they may let you go.
- You can develop the most complex banking application, you will get so many thank you, and if you are a contractor, they will still let you go and send the support to India.
- Your job will get outsourced (not may get outsourced, it will get outsourced, it is just a matter of time), my last contract was delivered and the support was outsourced to India.

The above is ok if you can develop the way you feel good, but in reality, there are tons, literally tons of stupidity out there (frameworks, procedures, you name it is has been invented)

You may feel that a simple application should be developed using simple procedures, in a way to produce a simple and easy to read code, and an easily managed application, but there is always someone with a stupid idea in charge that is following some outdated policy that he does not understand and you must follow it.

Working as a software developer use to be the beauty of writing instructions to make something happen, today it is no different than being a painter that was asked to paint a wall with damn ugly colors, and you must smile and keep telling them yes, the colors are beautiful Sir.

In todays IT it is either one of two options: to develop something you love, and you are maybe the next Google or Facebook but you will be with no income for long, or to develop something that you don't like, and you will make money, and the more people don't like a technology the more money you will make (examples, custom BizTalk, SharePoint code), and make sure to eat food to make you less depressed.
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